Editors’ Picks

SF Political Group Shares Stock Photo of LA Encampment in Call-to-Action for San Francisco
Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories

SF Political Group Shares Stock Photo of LA Encampment in Call-to-Action for San Francisco

Not-so-shockingly: It’s the same moderate (read: conservative) group behind the incredibly tone-deaf, pastel-colored “That’s Fentalife!” ads. San Francisco’s not in a state of entropic decay. (This isn’t, however, mitigating the city’s issues in regards to overdose deaths, housing insecurities, and ever-growing cost of living; mind you, all those issues stated above aren’t unique to San Francisco; they exist on some scale in virtually every large metro in the United States.) TogetherSF, one of a handful of moderate political groups in San Francisco that have emerged in recent years — most of which are significantly funded by outside private donors and “tech elites” — has made it a mission to slant with the City’s more conservative political leanings. Michael Moritz, the same mul...
The Importance of Explicit Consent in Kink and Fetish — at SF’s Folsom Street Fair and Far Beyond
Culture + Travel, Editors' Picks, Queerness

The Importance of Explicit Consent in Kink and Fetish — at SF’s Folsom Street Fair and Far Beyond

The largest kink and leather festival in the world descends on SF this weekend, putting into focus the need to ask for permission before exploring sexual intimacy. The human experience exists in tandem with sexual expression, regardless of where one falls on its spectrum.  (Asexuality is, after all, a form of sexuality that exists outside the realm of celibacy, the latter connoting refrain from engaging in sexual behaviors, rather than representing a person’s sexual expression; “aces” — the term used to describe asexual people — may still have interest in sex; their intimate lives aren’t organized around sexual intercourse, but rather emotional intimacy and relationship building; aces often masturbate and remain selective if they do choose to have sex with a consenting partner.) ...
Cruise’s New Self-Driving Car Is a Slap in the Face to San Francisco 
Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories

Cruise’s New Self-Driving Car Is a Slap in the Face to San Francisco 

Despite growing public criticism around its fleet of robotaxis, SF-headquartered Cruise recently debuted its new autonomous vehicle — which is designed to transport the most vulnerable among us. 2023 has been a contentious year for self-driving automobiles. They’ve been a topic of discourse around pedestrian safety; they’ve evolved from a quirky tech novelty to a terrifying driverless product that has hindered first responders and caused traffic delays.  People have taken hammers to them. Others placed cones on these AVs, effectively rendering them listless — “bricking,” as it’s become commonly known around San Francisco. Yet, despite public pushback and a reduction in autonomous-vehicle (AV) fleet size, these driverless Chevy Bolts are still combing SF’s hilly topography. In fa...
Here’s a Rare Glimpse of the Old Neon Signs at SF’s Cliff House
Culture + Travel, Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories

Here’s a Rare Glimpse of the Old Neon Signs at SF’s Cliff House

"Hey Siri, Play ‘Neon Lights (Rock Version)' by Demi Lovato." Earlier this week, it was joyfully announced that San Francisco’s beloved now-closed, iconoclastic Cliff House diner — which sits near Lands End, sacred acreage owned by the National Parks Service (NPS) — will reopen in 2024, courtesy of a newly granted 20-year lease to Sutro Lands End Partners, LLC.  Though the structure is expected to go through a major renovation, whatever inevitably will replace SF’s Cliff House must honor the building’s historic usefulness; such mandated services include the operation of a restaurant, cafe, retail store, and event space; NPS is requiring Sutro Lands Ends Partners to commit to these uses. “San Francisco has been good to me and to my family ever since my grandparents arrived here d...
The Burning Man Flood Brought to Life These Prehistoric Creatures
Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories, Nature + Climate Crisis

The Burning Man Flood Brought to Life These Prehistoric Creatures

With nearly an inch of rain flooding the Nevada desert in less than a week, three-eyed "dinosaurs" and shrimp as long as a human hand began popping up in temporary pools during this year's Burning Man festival. The scene that unfolded at this year’s Burning Man was apocalyptic; it also doubled as a sliding glass window into our future defined by the climate crisis. The unusual late-summer storm brought nearly an inch of rain — at least 0.8 inches, to be exact — from Friday to early Saturday morning. This rainfall amount is what the arid area normally receives over the course of two to three months. It’s little wonder then why this past weekend’s deluge left the temporarily erected Burning Man city inside the Black Rock Desert slick with mud, trapping its estimated 80,000 festival a...
In the SF Bay Area, Beyoncé Brings Out Blue Ivy Carter — Under a Blue Moon
Editors' Picks, Essays, Feature Pieces, Hyperlocal News + Stories

In the SF Bay Area, Beyoncé Brings Out Blue Ivy Carter — Under a Blue Moon

Days removed from attending Beyoncé's SF Bay Area stop on her Renaissance World Tour, the profoundness, pyrotechnics, and sheer talent displayed remains in our mind — "deadass." Beyoncé, as a concept, is hard to wrap one’s brain around... let alone Beyoncé as a human being. (The mere fact that the 29-time Grammy-winner belongs to the same species as the world’s other 7.9 billion bipedal apes is an enigma enveloped within a riddle.) But Mrs. Carter — or “Mayor Carter,” as she would later say in the first act of her nearly three-hour spectacle at Santa Clara's Levi's Stadium on August 30th, nodding to her honorary mayor distinction of the SF Bay Area county that was bestowed upon her that same day — walks and breathes among us. Nevertheless, sharing the same space as her, no matter h...
‘Did You Know That [There Was a Pedestrian Bridge at SF’s Ferry Building]?’
Culture + Travel, Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories

‘Did You Know That [There Was a Pedestrian Bridge at SF’s Ferry Building]?’

Constructed sometime in the late 1920s, San Francisco had a large pedestrian bridge on the Embarcadero that saw thousands walk across it daily. Opened in 1898, San Francisco’s Ferry Building began primarily as a welcome portal for people arriving by train. As the Gold Rush continued until the 1930s, thousands of people a day passed through the iconoclastic structures by way of shipping and fishing boats and, of course, ferries. At its peak during this era, SF’s Ferry Building saw as many as 50,000 people walk through the two-story public structure on a daily basis to commute by ferry. Lana Del Rey reminded us earlier this year that there is, indeed, “a tunnel under Ocean Boulevard'' in Long Beach, California — an underground passage opened in 1927 to provide a safe passage to the b...
I Got *V* Stoned at SF’s First-Ever Pizza, Bagel, and Beer Festival
Editors' Picks, Essays, Food + Drink, Hyperlocal News + Stories

I Got *V* Stoned at SF’s First-Ever Pizza, Bagel, and Beer Festival

‘At one point, I earnestly believed I saw Julianne Moore and Laura Dern cackling over two cold hard ciders.’ As my ostensible youth flickers into irrelevance, few activities coax me out of my innate introversion and into the greater, unknown collective. But the promise of complimentary meals and attractive novelties exist as evergreen proddings. (I could also argue that the opportunity to engage in fulfilling sex lives in that same canon, though time dedicated to after-work napping now usually takes prominence over any fleeting horniness.)   This past weekend on Saturday, August 19th, the intersectionality of those two nouns met in San Francisco’s first-ever food festival dedicated to all things carbohydrates, specifically pizza, bagels, and beer. Making things neurochemically more...
Out of More Than 700 BART Train Cars, Only One Is Like This
Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories, News to Know

Out of More Than 700 BART Train Cars, Only One Is Like This

BART's hundreds of train cars collectively have the single-highest train system capacity of any running transit line in the nation — and this hella spacious one is a reason why. BART is responsible for shuffling around 150,000 Bay Area riders to and from locations around the region every single weekday. Though this number is far down from its pre-2020 peak — BART regularly recorded weekday ridership of about 400,000 at that time— the rapid transit agency remains a lifeblood for the SF Bay Area. And its existence still remains on the fringe with state transit funding and regional toll increase integrations paused, all of which would help fund BART. Nevertheless, BART’s 700-plus train cars are an integral part of Bay Area life — a priceless norm of transportation. Among those hundred...
How the SF Bay Area Played a Major Role in the Creation of Sea Monkeys
Editors' Picks, Hyperlocal News + Stories, Nature + Climate Crisis

How the SF Bay Area Played a Major Role in the Creation of Sea Monkeys

It's estimated that billions of "sea-monkeys" have been produced and sold since they first came to market in the late 1950s. And they can all trace their roots back to a San Francisco aquarium. “Sea-monkeys” are equal parts cheeky novelty and wonder of the natural world. Though by no means apes — “sea-monkeys” are basically lab-grown iterations that can trace their ancestor to SF Bay Area brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) — they are a captivating member of the animal kingdom that played a crucial role in our early experiences of biophilia. But even as well-known and ubiquitous as these half-inch-sized invertebrates are, they still carry whims of mystery and rare facts. Case in point: Did you all know the SF Bay Area is linked to the later creations of this human-made brine ship sp...